The Art Of Deck Making

“The success of your presentation will be judged not by the knowledge you send, but by what the listener receives.” – Lilly Walters.

A good presentation deck will tell a story that will connect with the client on an emotional level. Before we ask our clients to make a financial investment, we must first ask them to make an emotional one.

Just like any form of storytelling, deck making is also an art. If you treat deck making as a chore, your presentation will reflect the same.

Aisha Hakim, associate creative director at 72andSunny, has come up with a brilliant slide deck titled “The Art of Deck Making” that explains the importance of visual storytelling in a presentation, with excellent pointers and examples. Check it out below.

THE ART OF DECK MAKING

"Simplicity, clarity, complexity, and ambiguity are not mutually exclusive states in language; the sensitive typographer is one who can manifest these states in the right mix by controlling the elements at his or her disposal." - Timothy Samara

GOOD DECKS SELL IDEAS.

Economist and Nobel Prize winner Daniel Kahneman believesthat upwards of 95% of our decisions are made emotionally.

So, before we ask our clients to make a financial, strategy-based investment, we must first ask them to make an emotional one.

WE'RE VISUAL. THEY'RE NOT.

Never assume your client can visualize your creative.

Our job is to get the client past their cloud of data and testing to see the value of emotionally driven work.

Decks can become routine. Don't forget the flowers when it comes to presenting ideas.

THE DECK COMMANDMENTS

OPEN STRONG.

Volvo Super Bowl (Example 1)

vs.

Volvo Super Bowl (Example 2)

USE VISUAL HIERARCHY

One visual focal point. Only include the necessary supporting copy or info that cannot be voiced over.

BE PICKY WITH KEYFRAMES

Keyframes (Example 1)

vs.

Keyframes (Example 2)

HIGH RES, EVERYTHING

High Res (Example 1)

vs.

High Res (Example 2)

VISUAL EMOTION > VISUAL PRESCRIPTION

Open on a girl and her dog watching TV (Example 1)

vs.

Open on a girl and her dog watching TV (Example 2)

PAINT A BROADER PICTURE

"As the car glides into motion, a small cup of hot Espresso is already waiting for him. The car is driverless. The voice we hear is an Al assistant." (Example 1)

vs.

"As the car glides into motion, a small cup of hot Espresso is already waiting for him. The car is driverless. The voice we hear is an Al assistant." (Example 2)

Paint a broader picture (Example 3)

SWEAT THE SMALL STUFF

Sweat the small stuff (Example 1)

vs.

Sweat the small stuff (Example 2)

BREAK YOUR OWN RULES

Your deck template is meant to be a design guideline, not a hindrance.

If an element works on one page but not another? Change it.

You won't be judged by how closely you stick to your template (within reason).

Always choose visual enhancement over template dedication.

All that matters is a good story to tell.

EVERY DECK MATTERS

A great deck is a love letter to your clients. Hell, it's a love letter to your ideas. It shows you take pride in them. It shows your dedication to detail. Art directors (and everyone!) should put effort into each deck. No matter how seemingly insignificant the information.

KERN YOUR ART CARDS

KERN YOUR ART CARDS (Example)

KERN YOUR ART CARDS (Kerned)

RECAP

Open With A Strong Visual. Pay Attention To Hierarchy. Use Keyframes. To Enhance Your Story. High Res, Everything. Visual Emotion > Visually Prescriptive. Sweat The Small Stuff. Paint A Broader Picture. Don't Be Afraid To Break Your Own Rules. Every Deck Matters. Kern Your Art Cards.

THANK YOU.

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